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Displaying items by tag: Crime Infoalamedacounty is a data warehouse and interactive mapping platform for Alameda County and the City of Oakland featuring down-loadable data, maps, reports and reports by Urban Strategies Council http://www.infoalamedacounty.org Wed, 23 Jul 2014 03:13:32 +0000 Joomla! 1.5 - Open Source Content Management en-gb Alameda County Violent Crime Fact Sheet 2012 http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/research/crimesafety/violenceprevention/acviolentcrime2012.html http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/research/crimesafety/violenceprevention/acviolentcrime2012.html

As part of our work in supporting the Alameda County Violence Prevention Initiative we recently produced an update of our county Violence Fact Sheet.  According to the 2012 uniform crime reports, Alameda County had higher rates of violent crime than California and the Nation. Over the past decade, 2003 to 2013, Alameda County has become increasingly violent while violent crime rates have decreased statewide. A majority of violent crimes continue to occur in Oakland. Although only a quarter of the County's population reside in Oakland, 68% of all violent crimes are reported in Oakland

2012 was a year of increased violence in Alameda County.  Compared to 2000, the rate of reported violent crimes in the County has increased by 25% and is close to the 12 year high of 818 reports per 100,000 residents.

 

ViolentCrimeRates 2000to2012

Robbery in particular, has increased dramatically: both Oakland and Emeryville have experienced rates of violence higher than their ten-year average (see table below)

violent forWeb

 

For more information please download the latest fact sheet or check out the raw data:https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AqO7wbVCIIt6dEhDcl9XckdRZ3p2Y1FBRXRjSE5sZlE&

 

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johng@urbanstrategies.org (John Garvey) Violence Prevention Wed, 19 Mar 2014 17:26:07 +0000
Eden Area Livability Initiative Community Profile 2013 http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/research/demographics/census2010/eali2013.html http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/research/demographics/census2010/eali2013.html

The Eden Area Community Profile 2013 was commissioned by Alameda County Supervisor Nate Miley to provide both a new baseline for understanding the five diverse communities in the Eden Area and to evaluate the changes since the initial profile was prepared. It is intended to support the work of Phase II of the Eden Area Livability Initiative (EALI) which commenced in 2012.

This profile gives a detailed overview of the area as a whole as well as the five communities contained within the area: Ashland, Castro Valley, Cherryland, Fairview and San Lorenzo.

 

Three key themes thread through each section of this profile: growth, diversity, and disparity. These themes provide an important framework for understanding the changes over the past two decades in the Eden Area and indicate the direction that the Area is moving towards in the future.

ealiInOUT

 

Three key themes thread through each section of this profile: growth, diversity, and disparity. These themes provide an important framework for understanding the changes over the past two decades in the Eden Area and indicate the direction that the Area is moving towards in the future.

Growth

Between 1990 and 2010, the Eden Area grew rapidly. In 2010, an additional 26,167 people resided in the Eden Area – representing a 25% increase since 1990. This growth equates to more than the current population of San Lorenzo—the second most populous community in the Eden Area. This growth can also be seen in the built environment with 5,436 housing units being constructed over the same time period; the expansion of transportation infrastructure like interstate 238; and the development of formerly open spaces like Five Canyons and along Palomares Ridge.

It is projected that Alameda County’s population will continue to grow in the coming decades. The pattern of the past two decades indicates that the Eden Area will continue to grow as well.

Diversity

Eden Area residents have become increasingly diverse in race and ethnicity. For the first time, the Area has a majority of residents who identified as people of color. This change is not only driven by the increased number of Asian and Hispanic or Latino residents, more than 20,000 people, but also by the significant decrease in the number of residents who identified as White, 15,512 people. This ethnic and racial diversity change affects several aspects of the community from the number of students who are English-learners to the composition of BART ridership.

Disparity

There are significant disparities among the different communities and neighborhoods in the Eden Area. Whether it is household incomes, the safety of neighborhoods, educational attainment or public health data there is no single description of the Eden Area. This gap between Eden Area’s communities grew in the past two decades. For example, household incomes in Castro Valley were 59% higher than those in Ashland in 2000. In 2010, the difference was 72%. Employment projections suggest that this trend will continue in the coming decade.

 

Main report PDF (33MB)

Intro only

Chapter 1: People

Chapter 2: Housing

Chapter 3: Health

Chapter 4: Economy

Appendix

Read the Executive Summary post

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it@urbanstrategies.org (Spike) Census 2010 Fri, 28 Feb 2014 19:55:46 +0000
UCR Crime Data and Viz http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/research/crimesafety/crimeres/ucr2011.html http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/research/crimesafety/crimeres/ucr2011.html

Downloaded the latest complete Uniform Crime Reports dataset of crime reports in Alameda County for 2011. We have added this to our running spreadsheet dating back to 1999. Thought I would add this to a good spreadsheet and play with some of there free apps!

If you want the spreadsheet go here:

https://docs.google.com/spreadsheet/ccc?key=0AkPhgUj0a5gEdGprRmhaeVlrTjlwbVFFendSV2ZYUEE&usp=sharing

Otherwise, play with the motion chart below.

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johng@urbanstrategies.org (John Garvey) Crime Research Fri, 15 Feb 2013 00:03:45 +0000
New Crime Data Available http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/data/dataportal/pubsafedataportal/ucrdata.html http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/data/dataportal/pubsafedataportal/ucrdata.html

Get the latest crime figures released by the FBI.

 

Map or download rates and counts of violent and property crime for cities in Alameda County. We offer data going back 10 years as both mappable layers in our dynamic web map or as a downloadable spreadsheets for your own desktop programs. Sorry about the excel format, if you change this to a more friendly format, please send it back to us and we will post it. Also, this data has several caveats including the different ways that localities report crimes and in the different estimates for population used to calculate rates.

Every year, law enforcement agencies submit reported crimes which are compiled and published as the Uniform Crime Reports (UCR) by the Federal Bureau of Investigation. These reports are meant to provide a standardized way to compare the intensity of crime across different communities and years. 

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johng@urbanstrategies.org (John Garvey) Public Safety Data Portal Wed, 30 Jan 2013 18:53:30 +0000
Our Method | Oakland's 100 Blocks Plan http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/research/crimesafety/violenceprevention/oakland100blocksmethod.html http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/research/crimesafety/violenceprevention/oakland100blocksmethod.html

To read about our results and why we published this study read this article.

METHODOLOGY

The Data

To build our model of the 100 most violent blocks in Oakland, we used ArcGIS (a desktop geographic information system) to determine the intensity of crime for every city block. With crime report data, however, there are some key assumptions and limitations to bear in mind:

  • Crime reports provided by Oakland Police reflect only a portion of the actual crimes in Oakland;an unknown amount of crimes are not reported.
  • Recorded locations of reported crimes are typically between 70 - 80 percent accurate.
    • No way to know which side of the street nor which end of a block,e.g. 1800 block Grand Ave
    • No precise location recorded, e.g. across the street from Bank of America ATM

 

Downloads:

 

Because the City has not publicly released what years their model was based on, we have developed our model using both 2011 and the five-year period from 2007-11 for comparative purposes. What was clear in the City's plan is that the two crime types used are homicides and shootings. For our model we have used the following data sets:

  • Homicide & shooting reports from 2007-2011 & 2011 (crime reports, geocoded and cleaned by Urban Strategies Council)
  • Filtered shootings at individuals
  • PC245 A2, PC245 B, PC245 D, PC664/187 A, and PC245 C (all shooting crimes)
  • US Census 2010 Blocks

 

Downloads:


Because crime report locations are imprecise at the best of times (until our police force zaps a precise GPS location for every event), simply calculating a sum of all the crimes on each city block will result in all kinds of erroneous, unreliable results. Crimes that are wrongly listed as 2500 Broadway will be assigned to the even numbered block on the right side of the street, whereas the crime may well have occurred out front of 2515 Broadway.

 

Building a Realistic Model

To deal with the problems of variable quality address data and the issues arising from wrongly assigning a crime to the wrong city block, we instead chose to use a model that incorporates all crime within a reasonable distance of each city block. We used census blocks for our model; these polygons are formed along the street centerlines of every city block and are a useful boundary type for analysis such as this. We calculated a buffer zone for every city block, using a radius of 292 feet around each block (this radius was determined by averaging the width of a sample of typical city blocks). This buffer ensures that all crimes that are located across the street from a particular block, and those that occur along the side street adjoining each block get included in the score for that original block. This model assumes that crimes happening within view of the corner of a block contribute to the violence perceived on that block and should influence it's score.

 

This map shows an example of the buffer used to capture crimes in each block to compensate for inaccuracies in the crime reporting process.

buffer blocks

(The rectangular red polygon is the 292 foot buffer and the blue polygon is the size of the actual census block)

 

This method does count each crime multiple times and as a result the total scores are somewhat arbitrary yet result in a reliable score indicating the associated violence for each city block. This type of model is often referred to as smoothing. In this case we are smoothing out errors in the original data and in problem areas influenced by violent crime.

 

Downloads:

 

The Process

 1. First we created the buffer layer- every single census block received a buffer of 292 feet.

 2. We counted every single shooting and homicide crime within these buffered polygons (using just 2011 data and also the five year 2007-2011 data) using a spatial join.

 3. We rank sorted the counts of homicides & shootings & selected the top 100 blocks with the highest counts of homicides & shootings (for both the single year and multi year data).

 4. When we rank sorted the 2011 data set we noticed that in the top 100 blocks we had a lot of blocks with a homicide/shooting count of 6, which was the lowest count included in the ranking. Including ALL the blocks with 6 counts, there were 131 blocks. When we removed the blocks with 6 counts, there were 72 blocks. To adjust for this problem we added a second ranking of all shooting types (based on the actual block boundary and NOT the buffer this time) and then selected the top 100.

 5. After adding the second ranking of all shooting types we removed the census blocks with 6 counts and 0 counts of all shooting types (based on the discrete blocks not the buffers). This left us with 100 blocks for the 2011 data set.

 

Downloads:

 

 

Penal Codes Used:

Statute Code Definition
Shootings involving individuals 
PC245 (A) (2)  Assault with a firearm on a person
PC245 (B)  Assault on a person with a semiautomatic firearm
PC245 (D)  Assault on a peace officer or firefighter with a firearm
PC664/187 (A)  Attempted murder with a firearm
Shootings at buildings, vehicles, firearm exhibition, or discharges (used in our expanded model)
PC245 (C)  Assault with a deadly weapon, other than a firearm on a peace officer or firefighter
PC246 Willful discharge of a firearm at an inhabited dwelling or vehicle
PC246.3 Willful discharge of a firearm in a negligent manner
PC247 (B)  Willful discharge of a firearm at an unoccupied vehicle or uninhabited building
PC417 (C)  Exhibit a firearm in the presence of a peace officer
PC417.8 Exhibit a firearm or a deadly weapon to resist arrest
PC417.3 Exhibit a firearm in the presence of a motor vehicle occupant

 

Get Data in Alternate Formats or Through an API:

 

 

 

Table 1

Primary Model 2007 - 2011 Homicides & Shootings

Within USC 100 Blocks

% Within USC 100 Blocks

Oakland Total

598

17%

3601

Primary Model 2011 Homicides & Shootings

Within USC 100 Blocks

% Within USC 100 Blocks

Oakland Total

165

20%

845

]]>
it@urbanstrategies.org (Spike) Violence Prevention Tue, 22 May 2012 20:43:34 +0000
Our take on Oakland's 100 Blocks Plan http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/research/crimesafety/violenceprevention/oakland100blocks.html http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/research/crimesafety/violenceprevention/oakland100blocks.html

In order to deploy resources such as police presence most effectively, it behooves a city to know where criminal activity is most prevalent. Because of the impact on the City and its residents, of most concern are areas where shootings and homicides occur most frequently. This reasoning appears to be a driving factor in the Mayor's Safety Plan released in late 2011: according to the limited city documents released for the plan, 90% of homicides and shootings occurred in 100 blocks. To date the city has published a low resolution map of the 100 blocks but has refused to specify blocks, regions or to provide any useful methodology (exact data used, procedures, assumptions). As a very high profile project, it is unusual for there to be so much secrecy around the exact location of this place-based effort.

As a trusted community intermediary and data resource we have received dozens of inquiries regarding which 100 blocks are the focus of the plan and the crime statistics used to support the selection of these 100 blocks. Since the city chose not to release the details of the blocks or their methods and data, we decided to conduct our own analysis to see if we could develop a similar 100 blocks model with available data.

In this document we share the results of our analyses along with tables and maps we produced and some observations of the implications of our findings. Additionally, we detail our methodology and will make the raw data used for this analysis available for others to replicate and confirm our results. We conclude this report with some lessons about public data that the 100 block example provides for policy makers and community.

 

Research Summary

Using Oakland Police Department (OPD) data on crime reports from 2007 through 2011, we built two models: the first model covered the entire five-year period and answered the question of which 100 blocks accounted for the most shootings and homicides in the City of Oakland; in the second model we focused only on the 2011 calendar year and identified the 100 blocks with the highest levels of shootings and homicides.

Within the two models we differentiated between two types of shooting offense categories. Our primary analysis includes more serious shootings involving individuals (PC245 A2, PC245 B, PC245 D, PC664/187 A, and PC245 C). We also developed a secondary model and summary statistics using the crime reports that included all types of shootings which includes shootings at vehicles, buildings, firearm exhibition, or firearm discharges (PC245 C, PC246, PC246.3, PC247 B, PC417 C, PC417.8, and PC417.3).

 

Our Results

In the five year model (2007-2011), we determined that 17%, or 598 homicides and shootings, occurred within the top 100 blocks in the City. There were a total of 3601 total homicides and shootings in the City over this period.

In 2011, we found that 20% of homicides and shootings (165) were within the top 100 blocks in the City, compared to 845 homicides and shootings in the City overall. (Note that the 100 blocks we identified from just 2011 data varied from those identified using the 5-year data set.)

 

Table 1
Primary Model 2007 - 2011 Homicides & Shootings
Within USC 100 Blocks % Within USC 100 Blocks Oakland Total
598 17% 3601
Primary Model 2011 Homicides & Shootings
Within USC 100 Blocks % Within USC 100 Blocks Oakland Total
165 20% 845

 

In our second model that included all shooting types the proportion of all shootings and homicides in our selected 100 blocks decreased by 2% for 2011 and remained the same for 2007-2011. This indicates that more serious shooting crimes are occurring in a slightly more concentrated area in 2011 than the wider set of shooting incidents.

Our expanded model shows that in 2007-2011, only 17% (1041) of total shootings and homicides occurred in the top 100 blocks, compared to 6112 in the City overall.

In 2011, 18% (268) of the total homicides and shootings occurred within the top 100 blocks, compared to 1515 in Oakland overall.

 

Table 2
Expanded Model 2007 - 2011 Homicides & Shootings
Within USC 100 Blocks % Within the 100 Blocks Oakland Total
1041 17% 6112
Expanded Model 2011 Homicides & Shootings
Within USC 100 Blocks % Within the 100 Blocks Oakland Total
268 18% 1515

 

 100 Blocks map


Click through the checkboxes in the layer box to display the 2011 and/or 07 - 2011 one hundred blocks.

 

{iframe width="700" height="500"}http://geocommons.com/maps/174768/embed{/iframe}

How do our 100 Blocks match up?

By georectifying the maps provided by the City of Oakland in their Oakland Safety Plan document, we were able to roughly compare the areas selected by the City with those determined using our methods. A visual comparison of our selected blocks reveals some obvious discrepancies in results produced by the two approaches. Because the City has not been specific in how it has calculated it's 100 blocks, it is very difficult to recreate an accurate method to test their approach.

Our single year and five-year models have several small areas of overlap with the City's 100 blocks, yet there are also stark differences between the two regions. There are two large block clusters in the City's published PDF that contain none of the top 100 blocks according to our methods; both of these are in East Oakland. There are also a number of block clusters in our model that are seemingly not part of the City's chosen blocks. Most notably the blocks clustered in central East Oakland, adjacent to High Street and along Fruitvale Avenue, are not part of the City's 100 blocks. This raises more questions with the City's published maps as it is difficult to know what year or period of time was used to derive the 100 blocks they identify in their plan. Additionally, it is not possible to know exactly which of the "shooting" offenses were included in the city's calculations resulting in their assertion that 90% fall homicides and shootings occur in 100 blocks.

Download the PDF of our 100 Blocks Map here. To see our results over an approximate version of the city's published version use this PDF.

The City has claimed that 90% of the homicides and shootings occur in just 100 blocks. In order to reach the 90% level of homicides and shootings in the City between years 2007-2011, we had to include 1,303 blocks out of the 6,560 total census blocks in Oakland. In 2011 we had to include 527 blocks out of 6,560 to reach 90% of homicides and shootings in the City. This suggests that homicides and shootings are more dispersed throughout the City and not as concentrated in a 100 block neighborhood as the City suggests.

 

Table 3 
Number of Blocks to Account for 90% of Homicides & Shootings
    2007-2011 2011
Homicides & Shootings Total Homicides & Shootings 3,601 845
90% of Total  3,241 761
  Census Blocks in City 6,560 6,560
  Count of Blocks to Include 90% of Homicides & Shootings 1,303 527

 

Appendix A shows a map of the blocks in our model and an estimate of the City's blocks. Here the yellow line outlines our representation of the City of Oakland's 100 Blocks based on the information that they have released. The light red polygons are Urban Strategies Council's 100 Blocks from 2007-2011 crime report data. The blue polygons are Urban Strategies Council's 100 Blocks from 2011 crime report data. The dark green polygons are where the 2007-2011 and 2011 100 Blocks overlap. The black borders are Oakland City Council Districts.

 

Implications for the 100 Blocks Policy

 According to our analysis, only 17-20% of homicides and shootings occurred in the top 100 blocks and our analyses identify somewhat different blocks than the city's analyses. Below are some of the implications of this plan given our uncertainty of the model used to define it.

 • Providing accurate, useful information to residents is not an optional part of governing. Sharing the details of this plan would empower and better engage residents, not drive a wedge between the public and city hall.

 • Any time such a large intervention is planned the public should be fully aware of the reasons and details that led to the development of such a plan- Measure Y is a prime example of visible policy and services.

 • Based on the published research from hot spot policing efforts in other urban cities, it should have been clearly communicated from the outset that focusing efforts to reduce crime in the most dangerous parts of the City would result in displacement of crime into nearby neighborhoods. This should have been addressed with either an on-the-ground effort to contain and control crime spread or with an analysis of the crime displacement resulting from this initiative. Such analysis uses a concept called the displacement quotient to measure the spill-over in crime, similar to what should have been done with the gang injunction analysis.

• With any serious initiative to reduce violent crime in a focused part of a city there should be a corresponding evaluation to help the public and other cities to learn if this intervention was effective or not. The Department of Justice requires such evaluations for its funded efforts and makes a point to publish these results so other cities can learn what works and what does not in reducing crime: these studies are published freely at http://www.crimesolutions.gov/ . Because the City has not published the data behind their model nor the exact block boundaries it renders the public powerless to judge the claims of the City regarding success of the initiative.

 

Some Lessons about Open Data and Transparency

 Since we have been unable to obtain the 100 block details or specifics on the datasets used, we have opted to build our own 100 block model and publish the entire project for full public scrutiny- the raw data, the results and the models. This is how we expect public policy to be made in a modern city; with full transparency and accountability in decision making, and so we are publishing this short study as an example of how open, engaged government should look. City budgets, funding and other public records must be publicly available and so it is inconsistent to be secretive when it comes to the development of the data analysis used to base a huge new city project upon. Under California law (Public Records Act, Section 6252(c)), any data used by a government agency must be made public for the public to sufficiently evaluate the claims of government. We strongly believe in and support data-driven decision making in local government, however when the data are not disclosed, decisions cannot be evaluated and there is a breakdown in the democratic process.

 

If you're inclined, or if you just love maps and data then we invite you to read our full methodology on how we build this model and derived all our figures.

 

Table 1

Primary Model 2007 - 2011 Homicides & Shootings

Within USC 100 Blocks

% Within USC 100 Blocks

Oakland Total

598

17%

3601

Primary Model 2011 Homicides & Shootings

Within USC 100 Blocks

% Within USC 100 Blocks

Oakland Total

165

20%

845

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it@urbanstrategies.org (Spike) Violence Prevention Tue, 05 Jun 2012 22:44:25 +0000
Oakland Crime Maps for 2011 by Police Beat http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Research/Crime-Safety/Crime-Research/Copy-of-Oakland-Crime-Maps-for-2010-by-Police-Beat.html http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Research/Crime-Safety/Crime-Research/Copy-of-Oakland-Crime-Maps-for-2010-by-Police-Beat.html

Like most measures of social outcomes and neighborhood indicators, crime is not evenly dispersed across the city, so a citywide average does not speak to the reality of every neighborhood in the same way. Our beat level crime maps are powerful tools for examining distribution and change in crime across our city. In 2011 we saw shifts in crime in both the flatlands and the hills, and with some crimes that saw drops overall there were certain neighborhoods that experienced marked increases in these very crimes.

These maps represent crime reports that have been aggregated to police beats for a number of key crime types including robbery, shootings, burglary, property and violent crimes as well as homicides. The accompanying table shows the beat level report summaries for the city as a whole. You can download the complete set of beat level maps here (large 12MB PDF) or click on the maps for a popup slideshow in your browser.

To see a summary table of all crimes in Oakland compared with the past three years and our innovative Crime Calendars check out this post.

(Click image to enlarge)

2011 Violent Crime

th2010Violence

 

2011 Change in Violent Crime from 2010

th2-2010ViolenceChange

2011 Shootings

th3-2010Shootings

2011 Change in Shootings from 2010

th4-2010ShootingsChange

2011 Assaults

th5-2010Assaults

2011 Change in Assaults from 2010

th5-2011assaultschange

2011 Robberies

th6-2010Robbery

2011 Change in Robberies from 2010

th-2011RobberiesChange

2011 Homicides

th7-2010Homicides

2011 Change in Homicides from 2010

th-2011HomicideYC

2011 Property Crime

th8-2010PropertyCrimes

2011 Change in Property Crime from 2010

th9-2010PropertyChange

2011 Burglary

th10-2010Burglary

2011 Change in Burglaries from 2010

th_2011_BurglaryYC

2011 Auto Theft

th11-2010Autotheft

2011 Change in Motor Vehicle Thefts from 2010

th-2011MVTheftsYC

 

For official inquiries into crime data please contact the OPD directly. These maps are designed as tools for planning, strategy, staff management and resource allocation. If you are interested in which crimes are happening on your block or in other neighborhoods at a detailed level try Oakland Crime Spotting. For more of our crime related research, mapping and analysis search for "crime" on this site or use this link to search for you.

Please note that as of October 2011, Urban Strategies Council is no longer under contract with the City of Oakland and the OPD to perform crime analysis. We are publishing these maps and data as a service to the community who have expressed an overwhelming desire for better access to usable information and data on crime in Oakland.

Note: UCR Part I Violent Crimes are as follows:

1: Homicide, 2: Attempted Homicide, 3-4: Rape, 5-8: Robbery, 9-12: Assault.

UCR Part I Property Crimes include:

13-15: Burglary, 17-19 Motor Vehicle Theft, 20-29 Arson.

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it@urbanstrategies.org (Spike) Crime Research Sun, 01 Apr 2012 17:17:59 +0000
2011 Oakland Crime Review http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Research/Crime-Safety/Crime-Research/2011-Oakland-Crime-Review.html http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Research/Crime-Safety/Crime-Research/2011-Oakland-Crime-Review.html

In 2011, Oakland experienced a number of changes in crime patterns when compared to previous years. Overall, reported violent crime in 2011 was almost identical in volume to 2010 with 6,805 reports, while property crimes saw a 5.4% increase over the prior year, up to 25,995. Major changes in citywide indicators included a drastic jump in assaults with a firearm [245(a)(2)] up 25.5% in 2010, and up 27.6% compared to the previous five-year average. Domestic violence saw a marked drop of almost 20 percent, which is the unusual due to the fact that domestic violence is the only crime benchmark that typically increases with high unemployment levels. Likewise, reported incidences of rape were down 26.3%, and both drugs and prostitution saw large drops of 43.4% and 16.8%, respectively.  However, there is a caveat that comes with drug and vice crime report statistics: reported drug and vice crimes are almost entirely dependent on police action--no active raids or stings effectively means no crime from a pure statistical perspective.

While in-home robbery was down from a high in 2010, the 198 reports still represent a 32.9% increase compared to the past five years. Carjackings declined compared to 2010, and over previous years, down 24.5% from 2010 to 2011 (188).

To see how crime was distributed across the city and how it changed according to police beats, read our related post on beat level crime maps.

CrimeSumm2011

Download the full table of data in a Google spreadsheet here.

* Over/Under compares the change in 2011 from the previous 5-year average.
* Note these totals are based on all reported crimes provided by OPD and will not accurately reflect official UCR reported totals due to
methodology differences. These numbers represent total counts of reports of each crime type.

Download the full PDF version of the 2011 Oakland Crime Calendars here.

CalViol2011

 

CalProp2011

CalShoot2011

CalRobb2011

CalBurg2011

CalDrugs2011

Note: As of October 2011, Urban Strategies Council is no longer under contract with the City of Oakland and the OPD to perform crime analysis. We are publishing these maps and data as a service to the community who have expressed an overwhelming desire for better access to usable information and data on crime in Oakland.

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it@urbanstrategies.org (Spike) Crime Research Mon, 02 Apr 2012 22:27:46 +0000
Oakland Stressors - 2011 Model Update http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Research/Crime-Safety/Crime-Research/Oakland-Stressors-2011-Model-Update.html http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Research/Crime-Safety/Crime-Research/Oakland-Stressors-2011-Model-Update.html

The City of Oakland and Urban Strategies Council have developed a new Stressor model for the city using the latest available neighborhood data.

This model provides a rank for every Community Police Beat in Oakland that indicates the relatively high or low levels of 'stress' on a neighborhood. The new model has been adjusted to account for newly available data and also certain data such as poverty that are no longer available from the Census Bureau. The indicators of stress include arrests, crime reports, food stamp recipients, youth incarceration and probation, violent suspensions and chronic absence for OUSD students.

Each Community Police Beat is ranked from 1 through to 57 with 1 indicating the most stressed beat in the city.  Beat 34X is the highest ranked beat in 2011.

2011 Top 5 Beats

1 34X

2 30X

3 29X

4 35X

5 06X

Stressor Trends

  • Beat 26X had the largest increase in stressor levels from 2009 to 2011 moving up from 51 (in the bottom 7) to 29 (middle of the pack).
  • Beats 10X, 12X and 27X also increased their stressor index by at least 15 places in 2011.
  • Beat 31X showed the largest drop in rank from 21 in 2009 to 41 in 2011 while beat 18X dropped 19 places to 39 on the list in 2011.
  • Three beats in both East and West Oakland showed increases of more than 3 indicators in the top ten citywide: 05X, 05Y, 10X, 27X, 29X & 30Y
  • Beats 07X, 21Y and 26Y showed decreases of more than 3 indicators in the top ten citywide.

 

2011 Stressor Ranking for Oakland Community Police Beats

 

Beat Rank by Z-Score
(1 = most stressed)
Z-Scores* # of Indicators scoring in top 10†
34X 1 1.33 9
30X 2 1.32 7
29X 3 1.25 8
35X 4 1.18 8
26Y 5 1.07 5
06X 6 1.05 10
27Y 8 0.86 4
27X 10 0.84 5
04X 7 0.88 6
30Y 9 0.85 6
07X 11 0.78 4
33X 13 0.63 3
02Y 12 0.67 6
02X 14 0.63 5
19X 16 0.56 3
05X 15 0.56 5
20X 17 0.40 3
23X 19 0.30 3
10X 18 0.32 5
32X 21 0.23 0
10Y 20 0.25 2
32Y 22 0.22 1
05Y 23 0.19 4
31Y 24 0.15 3
08X 25 0.08 2
21Y 26 0.07 0
21X 28 0.02 0
25X 27 0.06 1
26X 29 -0.06 0
24Y 30 -0.09 0
18Y 31 -0.14 0
31Z 32 -0.16 0
17Y 33 -0.17 0
28X 34 -0.18 0
24X 36 -0.23 0
11X 35 -0.23 0
17X 37 -0.28 0
15X 38 -0.38 0
18X 40 -0.44 0
12X 39 -0.40 0
35Y 41 -0.55 0
31X 42 -0.57 1
03X 47 -0.73 0
22Y 43 -0.63 1
03Y 44 -0.66 0
22X 45 -0.68 0
25Y 46 -0.71 0
14X 48 -0.74 0
01X 49 -0.79 0
09X 50 -0.80 0
12Y 51 -0.83 1
13Z 52 -0.93 1
16Y 53 -1.00 0
14Y 54 -1.03 0
13Y 55 -1.16 0
13X 57 -1.22 0
16X 56 -1.22 0

 

Download the full tables with rankings, scores and more.

 

New Methods

Because of changes in the availability of certain government data and because of shifts in policy, the new stressor model is not perfectly compatible with the 2009 stressor model and rankings. As such comparison between the two rankings should be done with some caution, however there are still valid insights possible when comparing the two models for most purposes.

To see how the stressors vary across the city we've prepared these maps at the end of this report:

1. "Stressors by Community Police Beat rankings for 2011" shows the city stress with darker shaded beats having higher rankings

2. "Stressor Index" shows the statistical values of the model and represents a measure of how much above or below the citywide average each Community Police Beat is. Blue is below and red indicates a beat is above the city average for the model.


Z-Scores

The Z-scores in the model are a statistical measure of how each beat compares using a combination of several indicators of stress. These Z-scores range from -0.12 up to 1.35 and are used to rank the beats from low to high stress.


Indicators

The Indicator counts are a new measure used to show how many individual indicators rank highest for each beat. For example beat 06X ranks sixth in the city for the Z-score total, yet has 9 of the 12 indicators that rank in the top ten, while beat 26Y ranks fifth overall based on Z scores yet has only 5 indicators in the top ten. We feel that used together, these two measures are more reliable than used separately.

 

Stressor Maps

To better understand how these stressors vary across the city and to aid residents in identifying the beat fo rtheir own neighborhood we have developed a set of maps showing the stressor rankings and the Z-Scores. The maps are shown below and can also be downloaded as full-size PDFs. Click on the thumbnail images for a larger map on screen.

Stressor Rank

stressorrank2011th

 

Stressor Index (Z-Scores)

Stressorindex2011th

 

]]>
it@urbanstrategies.org (Spike) Crime Research Thu, 16 Feb 2012 21:26:00 +0000
2010 Oakland Homicide Report http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Research/Crime-Safety/Homicides/2010-Oakland-Homicide-Report.html http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Research/Crime-Safety/Homicides/2010-Oakland-Homicide-Report.html

It's almost the end of 2011 and perhaps a strange time to release a report on an issue so immediate and dire as homicides in our city for the past year, but due to data flow and multiple priorities for our team we're only just getting to our update of this valuable report. This report presents the available data on homicides occurring in Oakland in 2010 and is made possible through the detailed data maintained by OPD's Homicide Branch. Urban Strategies Council has been producing these reports for several years and we'll be updating this new site with our historical reports very soon too. A few key highlights are included in this article, download the PDF for the entire report.


City Wide: Homicides Declined on a Yearly Basis from 2006 to 2010, Yet Remained High

In Oakland in 2010, 90 people lost their lives to violence, while in the 5 year period between 2006 and 2010, our community lost 594 people.  Despite these staggering statistics, the numbers killed have been declining on a yearly basis during this period.

Count of Homicides Per Year

2010homtrend


African-Americans Are Disproportionately the Victims of Murder

Out of the 90 people killed in 2010, 70 (78%) were African-Americans, while African-Americans composed only 28% percent of the city's population[1].  An African-American male between the ages of 18 and 39 was over 10 times more likely to be killed by shooting than any other resident of Oakland.

2010homrace


Age of Victims

In 2010, 30% of people killed were young adults between the ages of 18 and 25. One in ten victims was under the age of 18.

2010homage

 

Geographic Distribution

As always, no issue that exists in our community is evenly distributed across the city and with homicide this is very much the case. The map below illustrates how certain neighborhoods are more immune to this particular crime while others are home to high levels of such violence. In 2010 there were three community policing beats with between seven and nine homicides each while 25 beats saw no reported homicides at all.

2010hombeats


Download the full report in PDF


[1] This number represents those people counted in Census 2010 and who reported as single race-Black.

]]>
it@urbanstrategies.org (Spike) Homicides Mon, 28 Nov 2011 19:32:14 +0000
National Institute of Justice Innovation in Crime Mapping Award http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/News/National-Institute-of-Justice-Innovation-in-Crime-Mapping-Award.html http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/News/National-Institute-of-Justice-Innovation-in-Crime-Mapping-Award.html The Council was awarded the Innovation in Crime Mapping award at the recent Crime Mapping conference in Miami held by the National Institute of Justice (Part of the US Dept of Justice). Our winning work is below, click on the map for a modest size popup version or feel free to download the full PDF designed to print at 36"x48". The map shows how we analyzed both neighborhood housing and foreclosure trends and local crime patterns when considering how to implement our Community Land Trust as a strategy for neighborhood stabilization. We'll also be talking about similar work at the upcoming Federal Reserve of Richmond conference on Strategic Data Use to Stabilize Neighborhoods.

ESRI_Map_PressQuality_500px

Large PDF Version (Right Click and download only, 22MB file will hang many browsers)

East Oakland has faced multiple crisis over the past decades from heavy disinvestment in the mid century to spiraling crime and unemployment and failing public school systems in the 80's through to today. On top of this long term stress for this part of our city, the predatory lending of the early 2000's has resulted in massive foreclosures across an area with historically stable home ownership.

The Oakland Community Land Trust was formed to stabilize these communities and our model has combined very detailed neighborhood level data on crime, assets, foreclosure and housing condition to ensure our work is data-driven and proactive.

This map illustrates the growing burden of the foreclosure crisis on this part of Oakland over time and the changes in stability in serious crime in this neighborhood that makes any form of neighborhood stabilization that much harder.

 

]]>
it@urbanstrategies.org (Spike) News Fri, 04 Nov 2011 16:25:23 +0000
Oakland Crime Hot Spot Maps for the 3rd Quarter of 2011 http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Research/Crime-Safety/Crime-Research/Copy-of-Oakland-Crime-Hot-Spot-Maps-for-the-2nd-Quarter-of-2011.html http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Research/Crime-Safety/Crime-Research/Copy-of-Oakland-Crime-Hot-Spot-Maps-for-the-2nd-Quarter-of-2011.html

These crime report hot spot maps were developed for the Oakland Police Department to aid with intelligence-led policing efforts, to provide resource management support and to aid in targeting crime suppression tactics. These hot spot maps depict crime reports of: Violent Crime, Property Crime and Burglary and are arranged by Command Areas for the 3rd Quarter of 2011. A hot spot is an area with a higher intensity of crime than the surrounding area and is useful as a visual guide to identify areas of high crime incidence.

Click on this first map to help you determine which command area a given part of the city is in.

thcommand_area

Bureau of Field Operations 1

Violence

tn_ca1_2010q4_violence_density

Download High Resolution PDF

Notice: These files are very large and may crash your browser if you just click on a link. Instead we recommend you right click on the link and select to Download to your computer, then open the file once it has finished downloading.

Property

tn_ca1_2010q4_property_density

Download High Resolution PDF

Burglary

tn_ca1_2010q4_burglary_density

Download High Resolution PDF

 

Robbery

TN_Q16CA2_2011Qtr1_RobberyDensity

Download High Resolution PDF

 


Bureau of Field Operations 2

Violence

tn_ca2_2010q4_violence_density

Download High Resolution PDF

Property

tn_ca2_2010q4_property_density

Download High Resolution PDF

Burglary

tn_ca2_2010q4_burglary_density

Download High Resolution PDF

Robbery

TN_Q16CA2_2011Qtr1_RobberyDensity

Download High Resolution PDF

 

Hotspots is a term that describes locations with more than one report in the time period (3rd Quarter of 2011) or in areas where more than one report occurred in close proximity. While normally one report (incident) can include multiple crimes, these hotspots are computed using only one crime per report (incident), thus the actual number of crimes may be higher in the accompanying tables which show the beat level report summaries for each command area.

 

Note: UCR Part I Violent Crimes are as follows:

1: Homicide, 2: Attempted Homicide, 3-4: Rape, 5-8: Robbery, 9-12: Assault.

UCR Part I Property Crimes include:

13-15: Burglary, 17-19 Motor Vehicle Theft, 20-29 Arson, 30 Simple Assaults.

]]>
Crime Research Tue, 01 Nov 2011 17:20:21 +0000
Oakland Crime Maps for the 3rd Quarter of 2011 by Police Beat http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Research/Crime-Safety/Crime-Research/Oakland-Crime-Maps-for-the-3rd-Quarter-of-2011-by-Police-Beat.html http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Research/Crime-Safety/Crime-Research/Oakland-Crime-Maps-for-the-3rd-Quarter-of-2011-by-Police-Beat.html

In addition to our yearly hot spot analysis and weekly maps and analyses, we are releasing quarterly crime hot spot maps and beat level summary maps for the Oakland Police Department (OPD). The OPD uses these maps to plan for the seasonal shifts in crime across the city and to evaluate crime prevention and suppression efforts throughout the year. These quarterly maps are released publicly to inform public policy, community awareness and decision making in public agencies.

To see a summary table of all crimes in Oakland compared with the past three years or our innovative Crime Calendars check out this post.

These maps represent crime reports that have been aggregated by police beats for a number of key crime types including robbery, shootings, burglary, homicide and all violent crimes. You can download the complete set of beat level maps here (large 15MB PDF) or click on the maps for a popup slide show in your browser.



(Click image to enlarge)

Violent Crime

TN_2010Q4_Violence


Change in Violent Crime from 2nd Quarter 2011 to 3rd Quarter 2011

TN_2010Q4_Violence_Trends

Homicide

TN_2010Q4_Homicides

Change in Homicide from 2nd Quarter 2011 to 3rd Quarter 2011

tn_2010q4_homicide_trends

Shooting

TN_2010Q4_shootings

Change in Shooting from 2nd Quarter 2011 to 3rd Quarter 2011

TN_2010Q4_Shootings_Trends

Robbery

TN_2010Q4_Robbery

Change in Robbery from 2nd Quarter 2011 to 3rd Quarter 2011

TN_2010Q4_Robbery_Trends

Burglary

TN_2010Q4_Burglaries

Change in Burglary from 2nd Quarter 2011 to 3rd Quarter 2011

TN_2010Q4_Burglary_Trends

For official inquiries into crime data please contact the OPD directly. These maps are designed as tools for planning, strategy, staff management and resource allocation. If you are interested in what crimes are happening on your block or in other neighborhoods at a detailed level try Oakland Crime Spotting. For more of our crime related research, mapping and analysis search for "crime" on this site or use this link to search for you.

Note: UCR Part I Violent Crimes are as follows:

1: Homicide, 2: Attempted Homicide, 3-4: Rape, 5-8: Robbery, 9-12: Assault.

UCR Part I Property Crimes include:

13-15: Burglary, 17-19 Motor Vehicle Theft, 20-29 Arson, 30 Simple Assaults.

]]>
Crime Research Tue, 01 Nov 2011 17:20:07 +0000
Alameda County Violent Crime Factsheet 2001-2010 http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Research/Crime-Safety/Violence-Prevention/Copy-of-Alameda-County-Violent-Crime-Factsheet-2000-2009.html http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Research/Crime-Safety/Violence-Prevention/Copy-of-Alameda-County-Violent-Crime-Factsheet-2000-2009.html

The FBI have just released their latest Uniform Crime Reports data for City and County crime reports (FBI site), so we have updated our Violent Crimes in Alameda County fact sheet for 2010.  This brief report presents an overview of violent crimes in various cities in the county from 2001-2010.  This fact sheet is an important tool for stakeholders seeking to implement effective violence prevention programs in their neighborhoods.

Some of the main highlights from the factsheet include:

  • Since 2008, Alameda County's violent crime rate declined by just 18%, nearly twice the decline seen in the USA and California overall.
  • In 2010 Alameda County's violent crime rate exceeded the statewide rate by 50%.
  • In 2010 Oakland ranked as the most violent city in California with a rate of 1,529 violent crimes per 100,000 people. (See the Business Times article here for comparisons)
  • Over the ten-year period Oakland contributed on average 77% of the murders in the County.


Violent Crime Rate per 100,000 People from 2001 to 2010 in Alameda County

violenceAC2010

Aggravated Assault Rate per 100,000 People from 2001 to 2010 in Alameda County

agassaultAC2010

Factsheet download.

In 2005, the Alameda County Board of Supervisors adopted a violence prevention plan, A Lifetime Commitment to Violence Prevention: The Alameda County Blueprint. The Blueprint serves as the county's guide for supporting and sustaining violence prevention efforts, thereby creating safer communities.  As part of the plan, the county launched the Alameda County Violence Prevention Initiative, which funded violence prevention projects in several target neighborhoods that focused on the youth and reentry populations.

]]>
it@urbanstrategies.org (Spike) Violence Prevention Tue, 27 Sep 2011 00:10:12 +0000
Oakland Crime Hot Spot Maps for the 2nd Quarter of 2011 http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Research/Crime-Safety/Crime-Research/Oakland-Crime-Hot-Spot-Maps-for-the-2nd-Quarter-of-2011.html http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Research/Crime-Safety/Crime-Research/Oakland-Crime-Hot-Spot-Maps-for-the-2nd-Quarter-of-2011.html

These crime report hot spot maps were developed for the Oakland Police Department to aid with intelligence-led policing efforts, to provide resource management support and to aid in targeting crime suppression tactics. These hot spot maps depict crime reports of: Violent Crime, Property Crime and Burglary and are arranged by Command Areas for the 2nd Quarter of 2011. A hot spot is an area with a higher intensity of crime than the surrounding area and is useful as a visual guide to identify areas of high crime incidence.

Click on this first map to help you determine which command area a given part of the city is in.

thcommand_area

Command Area 1

Violence

tn_ca1_2010q4_violence_density

Download High Resolution PDF

Notice: These files are very large and may crash your browser if you just click on a link. Instead we recommend you right click on the link and select to Download to your computer, then open the file once it has finished downloading.

Property

tn_ca1_2010q4_property_density

Download High Resolution PDF

Burglary

tn_ca1_2010q4_burglary_density

Download High Resolution PDF


Command Area 2

Violence

tn_ca2_2010q4_violence_density

Download High Resolution PDF

Property

tn_ca2_2010q4_property_density

Download High Resolution PDF

Burglary

tn_ca2_2010q4_burglary_density

Download High Resolution PDF

Robbery

TN_Q16CA2_2011Qtr1_RobberyDensity

Download High Resolution PDF


Command Area 3

Violence

tn_ca3_2010q4_violence_density

Download High Resolution PDF

Property

TN_Q16CA2_2011Qtr1_RobberyDensity

Download High Resolution PDF

Burglary

tn_ca3_2010q4_burglary_density

Download High Resolution PDF

 

Hotspots is a term that describes locations with more than one report in the time period (1st Quarter of 2011) or in areas where more than one report occurred in close proximity. While normally one report (incident) can include multiple crimes, these hotspots are computed using only one crime per report (incident), thus the actual number of crimes may be higher in the accompanying tables which show the beat level report summaries for each command area.

 

Note: UCR Part I Violent Crimes are as follows:

1: Homicide, 2: Attempted Homicide, 3-4: Rape, 5-8: Robbery, 9-12: Assault.

UCR Part I Property Crimes include:

13-15: Burglary, 17-19 Motor Vehicle Theft, 20-29 Arson, 30 Simple Assaults.
]]>
Crime Research Mon, 01 Aug 2011 23:36:06 +0000
Oakland Crime Maps for the 2nd Quarter of 2011 by Police Beat http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Research/Crime-Safety/Crime-Research/Oakland-Crime-Maps-for-the-2nd-Quarter-of-2011-by-Police-Beat.html http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Research/Crime-Safety/Crime-Research/Oakland-Crime-Maps-for-the-2nd-Quarter-of-2011-by-Police-Beat.html

In addition to our yearly hot spot analysis and weekly maps and analyses, we are releasing quarterly crime hot spot maps and beat level summary maps for the Oakland Police Department (OPD). The OPD uses these maps to plan for the seasonal shifts in crime across the city and to evaluate crime prevention and suppression efforts throughout the year. These quarterly maps are released publicly to inform public policy, community awareness and decision making in public agencies.

To see a summary table of all crimes in Oakland compared with the past three years or our innovative Crime Calendars check out this post.

These maps represent crime reports that have been aggregated by police beats for a number of key crime types including robbery, shootings, burglary, homicide and all violent crimes. You can download the complete set of beat level maps here (large 15MB PDF) or click on the maps for a popup slide show in your browser.



(Click image to enlarge)

Violent Crime

TN_2010Q4_Violence


Change in Violent Crime from 1st Quarter 2011 to 2nd Quarter 2011

TN_2010Q4_Violence_Trends

Homicide

TN_2010Q4_Homicides

Change in Homicide from 1st Quarter 2011 to 2nd Quarter 2011

tn_2010q4_homicide_trends

Shooting

TN_2010Q4_shootings

Change in Shooting from 1st Quarter 2011 to 2nd Quarter 2011

TN_2010Q4_Shootings_Trends

Robbery

TN_2010Q4_Robbery

Change in Robbery from 1st Quarter 2011 to 2nd Quarter 2011

TN_2010Q4_Robbery_Trends

Burglary

TN_2010Q4_Burglaries

Change in Burglary from 1st Quarter 2011 to 2nd Quarter 2011

TN_2010Q4_Burglary_Trends

For official inquiries into crime data please contact the OPD directly. These maps are designed as tools for planning, strategy, staff management and resource allocation. If you are interested in what crimes are happening on your block or in other neighborhoods at a detailed level try Oakland Crime Spotting. For more of our crime related research, mapping and analysis search for "crime" on this site or use this link to search for you.

Note: UCR Part I Violent Crimes are as follows:

1: Homicide, 2: Attempted Homicide, 3-4: Rape, 5-8: Robbery, 9-12: Assault.

UCR Part I Property Crimes include:

13-15: Burglary, 17-19 Motor Vehicle Theft, 20-29 Arson, 30 Simple Assaults.

]]>
Crime Research Mon, 01 Aug 2011 23:36:06 +0000
Oakland Crime Hot Spot Maps for the week of May 22, 2011 http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Research/Crime-Safety/Crime-Research/Oakland-Crime-Hot-Spot-Maps-for-the-week-of-May-22-2011.html http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Research/Crime-Safety/Crime-Research/Oakland-Crime-Hot-Spot-Maps-for-the-week-of-May-22-2011.html

These crime report hot spot maps were developed for the Oakland Police Department to aid with intelligence-led policing efforts, to provide resource management support and to aid in targeting crime suppression tactics. These hot spot maps depict Violent and Property crimes and are arranged by Command Areas for the week of May 22nd, 2011. These maps are updated each week and include a month of reported crime data. For example, maps for the week of May 22nd show data from April 25th to May 22nd, 2011.

A hot spot is an area with a higher intensity of crime than the surrounding area and is useful as a visual guide to identify areas of high crime incidence.

Click on a map thumbnail to popup a large version of the map in your browser. If you want a full size version of these maps in high-res PDF please email us.


Command Area 1 - May 22, 2011

Violent Crime & Property Crime

ca1_m20110522a

ca1_m20110522b

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Command Area 2 - May 22, 2011

Violent Crime & Property Crime

ca2_m20110522a

ca2_m20110522b

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Command Area 3 - May 22nd, 2011

Violent Crime & Property Crime

ca3_m20110522a

ca3_m20110522b

]]>
Crime Research Thu, 09 Jun 2011 20:23:34 +0000
Oakland Crime Reports API http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Data/Data-Portal/Data-Feeds-APIs/Copy-of-Service-Provider-API-Reentry-Focus.html http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Data/Data-Portal/Data-Feeds-APIs/Copy-of-Service-Provider-API-Reentry-Focus.html

As part of our commitment to Open Data and to encourage others to analyse and use the data we manage, clean and curate we are making our crime reports database available publicly. If you are a coder, developer or hacker this is for you. If you're not technically inclined then we'd suggest you head on back to our Data Portal for more people friendly data. Or you can take a look at our analyses bases on these data in our partnership with the OPD here.

Oakland Police report data is generated from the Urban Strategies partnership with the Oakland Police Department. Cleaned and geocoded reports generally take one week to process, so data will be available up until the week prior. Crime report data is summarized by the week --Sunday - Saturday. Please note that the starting date is not always the Sunday of that week, but it represents the first instance of a report for that particular beat.

To obtain a layer of the boundaries for the community police beats, please go to:

Oakland Community Police Beats


////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////
Function Call: Get crime summary
Base URL: http://rest.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/api/usc/crimeAggregate
Options:
• format-[xml,json,serialize,php,html,csv]
• stdate (YYYY-MM-DD)-beginning date for query
• beat:string-community police beats in Oakland

Example Return
http://rest.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/api/rest/crimeAggregate/stdate/2011-03-02/beat/22x

<xml>
<item>
<start>2011-03-03</start>
<BEAT>22X</BEAT>
<Violence/>
<Property>5</Property>
<Homicide/>
<Assaults/>
<Robbery/>
<Burglary>3</Burglary>
<Rape/>
<Weapons/>
<Drugs/>
<Sex/>
</item>

 

]]>
johng@urbanstrategies.org (John Garvey) Data Feeds - APIs Wed, 01 Jun 2011 22:31:19 +0000
Oakland Crime Hot Spot Maps for the 1st Quarter of 2011 http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Research/Crime-Safety/Crime-Research/Oakland-Crime-Hot-Spot-Maps-for-the-1st-Quarter-of-2011.html http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Research/Crime-Safety/Crime-Research/Oakland-Crime-Hot-Spot-Maps-for-the-1st-Quarter-of-2011.html

These crime report hot spot maps were developed for the Oakland Police Department to aid with intelligence-led policing efforts, to provide resource management support and to aid in targeting crime suppression tactics. These hot spot maps depict crime reports of: Violent Crime, Property Crime and Burglary and are arranged by Command Areas for the 1st Quarter of 2011. A hot spot is an area with a higher intensity of crime than the surrounding area and is useful as a visual guide to identify areas of high crime incidence.

Click on this first map to help you determine which command area a given part of the city is in.

thcommand_area

Command Area 1

Violence

tn_ca1_2010q4_violence_density

Download High Resolution PDF

Notice: These files are very large and may crash your browser if you just click on a link. Instead we recommend you right click on the link and select to Download to your computer, then open the file once it has finished downloading.

Property

tn_ca1_2010q4_property_density

Download High Resolution PDF

Burglary

tn_ca1_2010q4_burglary_density

Download High Resolution PDF


Command Area 2

Violence

tn_ca2_2010q4_violence_density

Download High Resolution PDF

Property

tn_ca2_2010q4_property_density

Download High Resolution PDF

Burglary

tn_ca2_2010q4_burglary_density

Download High Resolution PDF

Robbery

TN_Q16CA2_2011Qtr1_RobberyDensity

Download High Resolution PDF


Command Area 3

Violence

tn_ca3_2010q4_violence_density

Download High Resolution PDF

Property

TN_Q16CA2_2011Qtr1_RobberyDensity

Download High Resolution PDF

Burglary

tn_ca3_2010q4_burglary_density

Download High Resolution PDF

 

Hotspots is a term that describes locations with more than one report in the time period (1st Quarter of 2011) or in areas where more than one report occurred in close proximity. While normally one report (incident) can include multiple crimes, these hotspots are computed using only one crime per report (incident), thus the actual number of crimes may be higher in the accompanying tables which show the beat level report summaries for each command area.

 

Note: UCR Part I Violent Crimes are as follows:

1: Homicide, 2: Attempted Homicide, 3-4: Rape, 5-8: Robbery, 9-12: Assault.

UCR Part I Property Crimes include:

13-15: Burglary, 17-19 Motor Vehicle Theft, 20-29 Arson, 30 Simple Assaults.
]]>
Crime Research Fri, 29 Apr 2011 18:45:22 +0000
Oakland Crime Maps for the 1st Quarter of 2011 by Police Beat http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Research/Crime-Safety/Crime-Research/Oakland-Crime-Maps-for-the-1st-Quarter-of-2011-by-Police-Beat.html http://www.infoalamedacounty.org/index.php/Research/Crime-Safety/Crime-Research/Oakland-Crime-Maps-for-the-1st-Quarter-of-2011-by-Police-Beat.html

In addition to our yearly hot spot analysis and weekly maps and analyses we are releasing quarterly crime hot spot maps and beat level summary maps for the Oakland Police Department. These crime report maps are used by the OPD to plan for seasonal shifts in crime across the city and to evaluate crime prevention and suppression efforts throughout the year. These quarterly maps will be released publicly to inform public policy, community awareness and decision making in public agencies.

To see a summary table of all crimes in Oakland compared with the past three years and our innovative Crime Calendars check out this post.

These maps represent crime reports that have been aggregated by police beats for a number of key crime types including robbery, shootings, burglary, homicide and all violent crimes. You can download the complete set of beat level maps here (large 6.5MB PDF) or click on the maps for a popout slide show in your browser.



(Click image to enlarge)

Violent Crime

TN_2010Q4_Violence


Change in Violent Crime from 4th Quarter 2010 to 1st Quarter 2011

TN_2010Q4_Violence_Trends

Homicide

TN_2010Q4_Homicides

Change in Homicide from 4th Quarter 2010 to 1st Quarter 2011

tn_2010q4_homicide_trends

Shooting

TN_2010Q4_shootings

Change in Shooting from 4th Quarter 2010 to 1st Quarter 2011

TN_2010Q4_Shootings_Trends

Robbery

TN_2010Q4_Robbery

Change in Robbery from 4th Quarter 2010 to 1st Quarter 2011

TN_2010Q4_Robbery_Trends

Burglary

TN_2010Q4_Burglaries

Change in Burglary from 4th Quarter 2010 to 1st Quarter 2011

TN_2010Q4_Burglary_Trends

For official inquiries into crime data please contact the OPD directly. These maps are designed as tools for planning, strategy, staff management and resource allocation. If you are interested in what crimes are happening on your block or in other neighborhoods at a detailed level try Oakland Crime Spotting. For more of our crime related research, mapping and analysis search for "crime" on this site or use this link to search for you.

Note: UCR Part I Violent Crimes are as follows:

1: Homicide, 2: Attempted Homicide, 3-4: Rape, 5-8: Robbery, 9-12: Assault.

UCR Part I Property Crimes include:

13-15: Burglary, 17-19 Motor Vehicle Theft, 20-29 Arson, 30 Simple Assaults.

]]>
Crime Research Fri, 29 Apr 2011 18:24:59 +0000